Showing 190 results

Authority record

Clarke, Somers

  • Person
  • 1841-1926

British architect and archaeologist. Born, Brighton 1841. Died, Mehamid 1926. Educated privately. His first architectural appointment was with Sir Gilbert Scott where he was responsible for church restorations. Surveyor of the Fabric, Sir Paul's Cathedral, 1897. Architect to the Dean and Chapter, Chichester Cathedral, 1900. Took up residence in Egypt in the early 1900s after retiring from general practice. Worked with J. J. Taylor at El-Kâb, and was involved with the publishing of some of the private tombs there. Assisted Quibell and Green at Hierakonpolis. Appointed to oversee the restoration of buildings in Egypt, including ancient monuments. Published several books relating to his work on excavations as well as architectural related works.

Clère, Jacques Jean

  • Person
  • 1906-1989

French Egyptologist. Born, Paris 1906. Died, Paris 1989. Trained as an artist at the École Bernard Palissy and the École des Arts Decoratifs. First started studying Egyptology with Henri Sottas at the École Pratique des Hautes Études, 1924. Student, École du Louvre, 1925. Worked with Bruyère at Deir el-Medîna, and then with Bisson de la Roque at Madâmûd. Studied Egyptian language with Moret, Weill, and Sethe. Qualified in the history of religion, phonetics, Latin, Hebrew, Arabic, and Berber. Director d'Études at the École Pratique des Hautes Études, 1949. Visiting Professor, Brown University, 1951-2 and 1960-1. Wilbour Fellow, Brooklyn Museum, 1967. Published many linguistic articles as well as several monographs.

Crum, Walter Ewing

  • Person
  • 1865-1944

British Coptologist. Born, Capelrig, Renfrewshire 1865. Died, Bath 1944. Educated, Eton, 1879, then Balliol College, Oxford, BA 1888. Became interested in Egyptology whilst an undergraduate, and went to study hieroglyphs, ancient Egyptian and Coptic with W. N. Groff in Paris, then with A. Erman in Berlin. Hon. PhD. Berlin. Went on to specialise in Coptic, eventually becoming the most eminent scholar in his field. He is most renowned for his <i>Coptic Dictionary</i> which he started work on in 1892. He visited many museums and libraries compiling all available material. The <i>Dictionary</i> was published in six volumes between 1929-39. In recognition of his contribution to the subject, he was elected Fellow of the British Academy, 1931, awarded D. Litt., Oxford, 1937, Volume 25 (1939) of the <i>Journal of Egyptian Archaeology</i> was dedicated to him, and the Byzantine Institute of Boston published a volume in his honour. He published extensively in his chosen field.

Dakin, Alec Naylor

  • Person
  • 1912-2003

British Egyptologist. Born, Mytholmroyd, Yorkshire 1912. Died, Bristol 2003. Educated, Heath School, Halifax, and read Literae Humaniores at Queen's College, Oxford; BA, 1935. He was the first Lady Wallis Budge Fellow at University College, 1936-42. Published several articles, including one with P. C. Smither entitled 'The Semnah Despatches', and another on Middle Kingdom stelae in Queen's College, Oxford (now in the Ashmolean Museum). Entered the Foreign Office in May 1940 and worked as a cryptographer at Bletchley Park. After the war left Egyptology and became a schoolmaster but took it up again in the 1970s.

Dawson, Warren Royal

  • Person
  • 1888-1968

British broker at Llyods and historian. Born, Ealing 1888. Died, Bletchley 1968. Educated at St. Paul's School. Many honours including OBE, FRSE, FRSL, FSA, Hon. Fellow, Imperial College of Science, and Hon. Fellow of the Egypt Exploration Society. Learned hieroglyphs in order to further his studies into early medicine. Published widely in many fields including Egyptology.

Dennis, James Teackle

  • Person
  • 1865-1918

American attorney and Egyptologist. Born, Baltimore, MD 1865. Died, Woodbrook, MD 1918. Educated Lafayette College and John Hopkins University, 1896-1903. Went to Egypt on several occasions between 1895 and 1907. Worked with the Hearst Expedition of the University of California at Gîza in 1903-4 and as a volunteer assistant to E. Naville at Deir el-Bahri. Published several popular books about his travels.

Dewey, John Frederick

  • Person
  • 1934-2017

29 September 1934 to 1 November 2017.
Born the youngest of 5 John grew up in South East London. During the war all of the children were sent out of London to live with other evacuee children in the countryside. It was discovered that he was the cleverest one in the family and went to Coffs Grammar School, where he was a keen member of the debating society, football, rugby and cricket teams.
In 1952 John went to King’s College, University of London, where he studied languages, and in 1955 he was awarded a B.A. Honours Degree in Modern Languages. He also gained a Diploma for Teaching English as a Foreign Language from Bonn University in Germany. His high level of language qualifications meant that he was taken on as a Graduate Trainee with Henry Gardner & Co, London.
John was appointed as a director of Henry Gardner & Co. and stayed with the company until 1974. His work entailed many overseas trips and he was heavily involved with the London Metal Exchange. In 1979 he was appointed director of the newly formed Strategic Metal Corporation and he stayed with that company until his retirement in 1989 at the age of 55.
It was during retirement that John’s love of Egypt and all things Egyptian really took over. He joined his wife, Peggy, who had been running Egyptology classes from mid-1988 for the Kent Adult Education community. Together they were instrumental in forming RAMASES, the Rainham & Medway & Swale Egypt Society. Once a year, John and Peggy took a party of students and other RAMASES Society Members on a trip to Egypt, often gaining access to sites not available to the Public. They arranged transport and accommodation, employing local guides and also formed lifelong friendships with other Egyptologists.
Holidays were spent in places such as Syria, Cyprus, Lebanon and Tunisia where anything of an archaeological nature was scrutinised, read about and discussed. Shorter trips to European cities were also organised for students, with the emphasis on Egyptian Exhibitions. Sadly, Peggy passed away in 2003 but John, with the support of his many Egyptology friends gained over the years, continued with his classes and trips.

Dewey, Peggy

  • Person
  • 1934-2003

12 March 1934 to 29 January 2003.
She ran Egyptology classes from mid 1988 for the Kent Adult Education community. Together with her husband John F. Dewey, she was instrumental in forming RAMASES, the Rainham & Medway & Swale Egypt Society. Once a year, John and Peggy took a party of students and other RAMASES Society Members on a trip to Egypt, often gaining access to sites not available to the Public. They arranged transport and accommodation, employing local guides and also formed lifelong friendships with other Egyptologists.
Holidays were spent in places such as Syria, Cyprus, Lebanon and Tunisia where anything of an archaeological nature was scrutinised, read about and discussed. Shorter trips to European cities were also organised for students, with the emphasis on Egyptian Exhibitions. Sadly, Peggy passed away in 2003 but John, with the support of his many Egyptology friends gained over the years, continued with his classes and trips.

Dévaud, Eugène Victor

  • Person
  • 1878-1929

Swiss Egyptologist. Born, Fribourg 1878. Died, 1929. Lecturer at Fribourg University, Switzerland 1923; Professor 1927. Constributed significantly to the study of Coptic etymologies and published articles on this subject in various journals.

Edwards, Amelia Ann Blanford

  • Person
  • 1856-1891

British author and Egyptologist. Born, London 1831. Died, Westbury-on-Trym 1892. Displayed an early talent for writing, drawing, and opera singing. She pursued a career in journalism, wrote several novels, and also edited art and history publications. During this time she fostered a great interest in Egyptology, which led to her studying hieroglyphs. She visited Egypt in 1873-4, after which she wrote her most renowned publication <i>A Thousand Miles Up the Nile</i> (1877). She founded the Egypt Exploration Fund along with R. S. Poole and Sir E. Wilson, its aim being to excavate and preserve monuments. She gave up all her other interests so that she could concentrate on being the EEF's Secretary and to publicize its cause. She wrote numerous articles including excavation reports. In her will she left provision for the establishment of the first chair of Egyptian archaeology in England, which was at University College London, its first holder being Flinders Petrie.

Edwards, Iorwerth Eiddon Stephen

  • Person
  • 1909-1996

British Egyptologist. Born, London 1909. Died, London 1996. Educated at Merchant Taylor's school, where he studied Biblical Hebrew, then at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, where he read Arabic and Hebrew, graduating in 1933. Awarded the William Wright studentship in Arabic in 1932. Appointed Assistant Keeper in the Department of Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities at the British Museum, taking up the position in 1934. He studied Egyptian under Glanville during his first few years in the Department. He published <i>Hieroglyphic Texts from Egyptian Stelae, etc.</i>, viii in 1939. Elected Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries in 1942, the year he was called up for military service. The first edition of <i>The Pyramids of Egypt</i> was published in 1947 and was reprinted many times. Appointed Keeper of the new department of Egyptian Antiquities in 1955. Made a Fellow of the British Academy in 1962, and awarded the CBE in 1968 for his services to the British Museum. He was instrumental in arranging the Tutankhamun exhibition at the British Museum in 1972. Was involved in the UNESCO rescue of the Philae Temples after his retirement from the Museum in 1974.

Eisler, Robert

  • Person
  • 1882-1949

Austrian cultural historian, influenced by Jung. Born, Vienna 1882. Died, Oxford 1949. He had a wide range of interests and published controversial books and articles on various subjects including Christianity, astronomy, economics and psychology.

Emery, Walter Bryan

  • Person
  • 1903-1971

British Egyptologist. Born, Liverpool 1903. Died, Cairo 1971. Educated St. Francis Xavier's College, Liverpool, then the Institute of Archaeology, Liverpool University, 1921-3. Went out to Egypt for the first time as an assistant to the EES excavations at Amârna in 1923-4. Also worked for Mond at Luxor and Armant, 1923-8. Subsequently directed excavations at many sites in Egypt, notably his work at North Saqqâra in 1935-9. Served with the British Army 1939-46, afterwards attached to the British Embassy in Cairo. In 1951 appointed to the Edwards Professorship at University College London, which he held until his retirement in 1970. Worked in the Sudan and at Qasr Ibrîm in the 1950s and 60s.

Engelbach, Reginald

  • Person
  • 1888-1946

British Egyptologist and engineer. Born, Moretonhampstead 1888. Died, Cairo 1946. Educated at Tonbridge School. Trained as an engineer at the City and Guilds Institute, 1905-8. He suffered poor health and went to Egypt in order to recuperate, 1909-10. When he returned to Britain he studied Egyptology, Coptic, and Arabic at University College, London. From 1911 onwards he assisted Petrie on many excavations. During the First World War he was commissioned by Allenby to report on ancient sites in Syria and Palestine. Appointed Chief Inspector for Upper Egypt, 1920. Assistant Keeper, Cairo Museum, 1924. Chief Keeper, 1931. Retired 1941. He was awarded several honorary titles. He published extensively, some of his most important contributions being those where he was to able to apply his engineering expertise.

Eyton-Jones, Theodora

  • Person
  • c. 1890-1975

Theodora Eyton-Jones was born in China, the daughter of a missionary. In 1930 she undertook a visit to the Patriarchs of the Eastern Churches, which she described in her book <i>Under eastern roofs</i> (1931). She married the Revd Leonard Patterson, and after his death adopted the name 'Eyton-Patterson', although she used her maiden name for writing.

Foucart, Georges

  • 1865-1943

French Egyptologist. Born, Versailles 1865. Died, Zamalek 1943. Trained by his father Paul F., a Classicist and Director of the French School in Athens. Then studied at the École des Hautes Études. Appointed Inspector of Antiquities of Lower Egypt, 1892-4. Professor of Ancient History, University of Bordeaux, 1897. Professor of History of Religions, Aix-en-Provence, 1903. D.Ph., 1910. Director of IFAO, 1915-28. Published many important articles on the history of religion.

Fratelli Alinari

  • Organisation
  • est. 1852

Professional photographers. Founded in Florence in 1852.

Gardiner, (Sir) Alan Henderson

  • Person
  • 1879-1963

British Egyptologist. Born, Eltham 1879. Died, Oxford 1963. Educated at Charterhouse, then studied Classics, Hebrew and Arabic at The Queen's College, Oxford. Worked with A. Erman on the preparation of material for the <i>Wörterbuch der ägyptischen Sprache</i> and was sub-editor 1906-8. Laycock Studentship, Worcester College, Oxford, 1906-12. Edited many Egyptological publications including the <i>Journal of Egyptian Archaeology</i>. Published extensively in the field of Egyptology. Honorary Secretary of the Egypt Exploration Society, 1917-20, Vice President and then President, 1959-63. Many distinctions during his career. Specialized in hieratic texts on papyri and ostraca. Published the 1st edition of <i>Egyptian Grammar</i> in 1927, which is still one of the essential learning aids for Middle Egyptian. Member of the Tutankhamun excavation team, for which he recorded all the inscriptions from the tomb.

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